TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1

Case Presentation
Chief complaint: Abdominal pain and weight loss for 3 months.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Cancer Center Profile

What started as tumor board conferences a decade ago has grown into a true multidisciplinary team approach to comprehensive breast care. ProHealth Care’s Center for Breast Care at Waukesha Memorial Hospital’s Regional Cancer Center in Waukesha, Wisconsin, is an interdisciplinary breast cancer clinic where patients can see multiple specialists in one visit. With the opening of the clinic, the various specialists involved in patient care can talk to each other about a patient in real time, not replacing tumor board conferences, but taking patient care to the next level.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Supportive Care

To help patients cope with terminal illness, healthcare providers must imagine themselves in the place of these patients, according to Tami Borneman, MSN, CNS, a research specialist at City of Hope Cancer Center in Duarte, California.

In a presentation at the sixth annual Oncology Congress, she coaxed her audience to pretend their own deaths were imminent. “I really want us to take in what it’s like to be a person receiving bad news,” she said.

Healthcare workers need such exercise es, because communicating bad news is really difficult, she said.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Nursing

A master’s level oncology specialization program prepares nurses with the clinical, cultural sensitivity, and research skills they will need to deal with issues impacting underrepresented minorities.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Survivorship

Cancer is a disease for the entire family to survive, whether in terms of emotional hurt or the provision of concrete physical care. And alongside partners, spouses, and friends, many survivors care for young children. Kathryn E. Weaver, PhD, of Wake Forest University School of Medicine and her fellow researchers estimate that 1.58 million US cancer survivors live with minor children, totaling 2.85 million young people in all (Cancer. 2010; 116:4395-4401).

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Genitourinary Cancers

ORLANDO—Computed tomography (CT) scanning and blood tests to determine tumor markers are very important in the follow-up of stage I nonseminomatous testicular cancer (NSTC), but the physical examination is of limited value, according to new research presented in a poster session.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Nursing

ORLANDO—Most nurses who care for patients with cancer are at risk for compassion fatigue and burnout and may leave the profession as a result, according to a new survey.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Prevention

ORLANDO—Nurse practitioners are in an ideal position to assess whether nonurgent emergency department patients are undergoing recommended mammography for breast cancer screening, a new study has found.

“Even though they know that breast cancer is a serious disease, many women are still not being screened with mammography,” said Karen Paraska, CRNP, PhD, assistant professor of nursing at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, during her poster presentation.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Prevention

ORLANDO—A pilot program that instituted some small changes, including use of chlorhexadine scrubs the evening before surgery and then again 12 hours later on the morning of surgery, was able to reduce surgical site infections in one Ohio cancer center by almost 20% after 12 months.

TON - February 2011 Vol 4, No 1 published on February 16, 2011 in Supportive Care

ORLANDO—Patients often do not understand the terms clinicians use to describe their hematologic malignancies, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, which may lead to misunderstandings about their disease.

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