Original Research

Oral chemotherapeutic agents have been available for many years, and were traditionally cytotoxic drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and mercaptopurine. In recent years, oral anticancer medications are being used more often in many types of cancer.
It is well-known that patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who receive induction and reinduction chemotherapy and any patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) are at high risk for infections and prolonged hospital stays. Intensive chemotherapy regimens used in these settings cause patients to be neutropenic for prolonged durations.
Pain is one of the most feared symptoms of cancer, with uncontrolled pain being the most frequently reported symptom in hospitalized patients with cancer. As cancer stage progresses, the pain intensity and incidence increase, with cancer pain reported in 62% to 86% of patients with advanced disease.
Pharmacists are becoming increasingly involved in cancer care. This raises a vital question: How aware are pharmacy students of the expanding roles and opportunities in oncology pharmacy?
The paradigm of oncology practice has changed significantly in recent years with the rapid emergence and use of oral chemotherapy agents.
Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection presents a unique challenge in patients with cancer. C difficile infections are often related to the use of antibiotics and to hospitalizations, and patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment may be at a particularly high risk for infection.

Autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) extends overall survival for patients with multiple myeloma and is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

Oral chemotherapy agents (OCAs) continue to play an increasing role in the treatment and management of many oncologic diseases.
Justin Arnall, PharmD, discusses the clinical significance of his research and case study on, “Loss of Pregnancy in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia During Treatment with Nilotinib.”
The use of closed-system transfer devices (CSTDs) for compounding hazardous medications has become an accepted standard of practice to minimize environmental exposure to these agents.
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