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Case Reports

Paclitaxel is a taxane-derived antineoplastic agent that is often used for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications such as breast cancer, AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma, ovarian cancer, and non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).1 It is also widely used for a number of off-label indications, and it works by promoting the assembly of microtubules, further enhancing the inhibition of cellular replication. It is administered as an intravenous (IV) solution, and its dosage and duration of treatment vary based on the indication.1 Patients with high-risk breast cancer in the preoperative or the adjuvant setting can receive either dose-dense paclitaxel (ie, 175 mg/m2 every 2 weeks for 4 cycles) or weekly paclitaxel (ie, 80 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks). In breast cancer, paclitaxel can be administered after the use of an anthracycline, in combination with cyclophosphamide.2
The European Society for Medical Oncology-European Oncology Nursing Society (ESMO-EONS) defines extravasation as the unintended leakage of a substance into the subcutaneous or subdermal tissue around the intravenous or intra-arterial administration site.
Recognizing the difference between “self” and “nonself” is a crucial role of the immune system; to regulate this recognition process, the immune system uses complex pathways, including several immune checkpoints. Recent understanding of these checkpoints, and how they affect T-cell activation, has led to therapeutic targets for cancer treatment.

The authors describe a case of an undetectable everolimus level in a patient with kidney cancer who received phenobarbital and was hospitalized because of heart failure.

Hematology oncology pharmacists should be aware of this rare and potentially devastating complication of temozolomide therapy.

To our knowledge, cases of successful treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with low-dose nilotinib (Tasigna) have not been reported. The following case represents our experience with a patient with CML who achieved good response to nilotinib therapy.
To our knowledge, cases of successful treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with low-dose nilotinib (Tasigna) have not been reported. The following case represents our experience with a patient with CML who achieved good response to nilotinib therapy.

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