Original Research

The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) each publish antiemetic and supportive care guidelines for patients who are undergoing chemotherapy treatment.
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is among the most common hematologic malignancies, with an annual incidence of 6020 patients in the United States, of which 2000 to 2500 cases occur in adults. Trends have shown an early peak between the ages of 4 and 5 years, with another increase after the age of 50 years.
Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (CIFN) is a life-threatening, costly complication that may develop in patients with cancer after receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. In 1991, filgrastim (Neupogen) was approved for the treatment of patients with CIFN, because it stimulates the production of neutrophils, which potentially treats and prevents febrile neutropenia.
Cetuximab and panitumumab, monoclonal antibodies directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), are an integral component in the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), specifically those with KRAS wild-type tumors.
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, with an estimated 238,590 new cases diagnosed in 2013 and 29,720 deaths.
Children diagnosed with cancer undergo changes in body weight secondary to illness and treatment. With progression to malnutrition come a number of significant complications.
Most patients with cancer have multiple comorbidities and are at high risk of polypharmacy. In addition, reviews have shown that up to 33% of ambulatory patients with cancer are at risk of drug–drug interactions.
Although medical oncology has furthered effective cancer treatment for many decades, finding effective treatment for patients with advanced cancer is challenging. Millions of dollars support publicly funded cancer research every year, and patients expect that the latest cancer research will bring us one step closer to discovering a cure.
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common comorbidity among patients with cancer. It is often one of the initial signs for the presence of malignancy, and its presence increases the complexity of patient care within this patient population. Studies have shown that 15% to 20% of all acute VTE cases are associated with malignancy, 2% to 5% of cases are diagnosed concurrently with cancer, and 5% to 10% of cases are diagnosed during a cancer follow-up visit.1 Therefore, VTE is a significant complication affecting quality of life and patient prognosis. In fact, VTE is known to represent one of the leading causes of death in this patient population,2 and it is discovered at autopsy in at least 50% of patients with cancer.3,4 This percentage is thought to be underestimated; therefore, it is imperative to recognize this medical problem and to appropriately deploy effective treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality.

Background: The incidence of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) has been reported in 42% of adults with hematologic malignancies and can result in serious laboratory findings and clinical manifestations. The clinical manifestations may be severe, leading to dialysis therapy and/or death. The exact incidence of these severe outcomes has not been determined; however, strategies to determine the risk for these complications have been proposed.

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